FAQ’s

  • Q1.  Who do you work for?

A1.  I work for Systech International as a Regulatory Strategist.  RxTrace is independent of my employer and so they have no input into what I publish.

Q2.  Are you a consultant for hire?

A2.  No.  My role at Systech, plus my independent writing on RxTrace leaves me no time to do consulting anymore.

Q3.  Why are you writing this blog?

A3.  I really enjoy writing (perhaps too much, given the length of my essays) and I have a long history of applying computer technology to solve supply chain problems.  I have been a part of the dialog, brainstorming and debate of serialization and pedigree in the pharmaceutical supply chain since about 2003.  I have participated in GS1 and EPCglobal work groups since 2004 and I had the opportunity to help lead the work group that developed the GS1 EPCglobal Drug Pedigree Messaging Standard (DPMS).  From that experience I was able to study the problem of applying modern software and database technology to compliance with pedigree regulations.  I think I learned a lot and today I see a fair amount of mis-understanding and confusion over the same topic.  My hope is that this blog will serve as an educational tool for some and a source of ideas and debate for others.  It contains my opinions as they were at the time I wrote each post.  I reserve the right to change my mind on any topic, and if I do, I will write about it again and let you know.

Q4.  How can I reach you privately?

A4.  You can send me a private message through this page.

I will not quote anything from your private message without your permission so don’t worry about telling me what you really think.  I also encourage you to make public comments under one of my posts.  That’s the way to really get the debate going.

Q5.  Where do you get the ideas for your essays?

A5.  I actually have an oversupply of ideas for future posts at any one time.  I keep lists of them.  Some ideas are sent to me by my vast and amazing network of friends and supporters (thanks, by the way), but sometimes they come from ideas that come out of mis-understandings I hear people reveal in conversations and meetings I attend.  Others are just things that I think people are overlooking.  I usually start by doing a bunch of Google searches on the topic and reading.  That’s where I usually get some of the links I include in the final essay.  Eventually I get some time to sit down and write up a first draft.  Sometimes I discard the whole idea, sometimes I throw out the draft and start over, and sometimes I keep massaging it until I feel comfortable putting it out there for friends and strangers to read with my name on it.  It’s pretty intense.

Q6.  If I follow your blog, will I get to hear inside information from GS1 or the other organizations you participate in?

A6.  No.  I try very hard not to include content in my blog that is internal to GS1 and the other organizations I am a member of (including my employer).  I try to use two sources:  my own thoughts, opinions and ideas, and public information I find on the internet.  If you believe I have crossed the line in any essay, please call me out on it, publicly or privately, and I will do my best to remove that information.  It is not my intent to reveal anything that is covered by non-disclosure agreements or IP Opt-in agreements.

Q7.  What tools do you use to generate your blog?

A7.  In early January of 2010 I moved the blog from www.blogspot.com (a Google company) to a generic webpage hosted by GoDaddy.com.  With the help of Matt Geiger we installed the free WordPress blogging engine and “database” from www.wordpress.org.  GoDaddy has excellent tech support and they are very familiar with the in’s and out’s of porting blogs from BlogSpot to WordPress. With their guidance we were able to move all of my old content from BlogSpot to the hosted WordPress database over one weekend.  We’ve been tweaking it ever since.

DISCLAIMER: RxTrace contains some of the personal thoughts, ideas and opinions of Dirk Rodgers. The material contained in RxTrace is not legal advice. Dirk Rodgers is not a lawyer.
The reader must make their own decisions about the accuracy of the opinions expressed in RxTrace. Readers are encouraged to consult their own legal counsel
and trading partners before taking any actions based on information found in RxTrace. RxTrace is not a vehicle for communicating
the positions of any company, organization or individual other than Dirk Rodgers.

RxTrace, a comprehensive exploration of the intersection between healthcare supply chains, track and trace technology, standards and global regulatory compliance.
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