Category Archives: EU FMD

FMD, One Year Out

Last Friday marked one year to go for the start of the Falsified Medicines Directive (FMD) and the Delegated Regulation (EUDR) in the European Union (EU) (see “More Concerns With The FMD/EUDR Big Bang Start”).  With the one year delay in the serialization and verification requirement of the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) in the US, the deadlines for these two markets are only about 10 weeks apart, assuming there won’t be any more delays.  I don’t expect another delay in the manufacturer’s serialization and verification deadline in the US, and I haven’t talked with anyone who expects Continue reading FMD, One Year Out

The FMD Product Code

Under the Falsified Medicines Directive (FMD), starting on February 9, 2019 drug manufacturers must begin affixing a new Unique Identifier and an anti-tamper device to all consumer packages of prescription drugs (see “The E.C. Officially Published The Pharma Safety Feature Delegated Act This Morning”).  The Unique Identifier must be composed of a Product Code, Serial Number, Batch Number, Expiration Date and, where required, a National Reimbursement Code (see “The ‘Unique Identifier’ in the EU Delegated Act”).  This data must be uploaded to the E.U. Hub prior to shipment into the supply chain.  All of the details are spelled out in the Delegated Regulation (EUDR).

One of the more interesting aspects of the FMD/EUDR is the Product Code. Continue reading The FMD Product Code

More Concerns With The FMD/EUDR Big Bang Start

iStock.Licensed.criminalThe key part of Article 50 of the European Union Delegated Regulation (EUDR) says:  “This Regulation…shall apply from 9 February 2019.”  That’s the date of the “big bang”—the date everything takes effect.  On that date, all drugs entering E.U. markets (except in Italy, Belgium and Greece) must contain the two safety features called out by the regulation on their packaging, including an anti-tamper device and a compliant Unique Identifier (see “The ‘Unique Identifier’ in the EU Delegated Act”).  It is the date by which “National Competent Authorities” in each of the EU member states (except the three listed above) must offer a data repository for the covered drug products that are targeted at their local market.  And it is the date on which dispensers (called “persons authorised or entitled to supply medicinal products to the public” in the text) must begin using the system of repositories to “…verify the safety features and decommission the unique identifier of any medicinal product bearing the safety features they supply to the public…”.  All on the same day.  The day of the “big bang”.

This “big bang” start will result in some problems. Continue reading More Concerns With The FMD/EUDR Big Bang Start

EU FMD: Aggregation Is Not Mandated, But It Will Be Necessary

iStock_000016455220_SmallerEver since the E.U. Falsified Medicines Directive (FMD) was passed in 2011 my European friends have touted the fact that their government mandated solution would take a “bookend” approach.  The implication was always that it would be much less complex than the ePedigree approaches that were being planned by various U.S. states, and then by the U.S. federal government with the passage in 2013 of the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA).

My friends always liked to point out how simple Continue reading EU FMD: Aggregation Is Not Mandated, But It Will Be Necessary

Insufficient Transitional Measures Doom The FMD-EUDA

EU Member States
EU Member States. Source

The pharmaceutical supply chain in most markets is complex, but in my view, the one in the European Union easily takes the prize for being the most complex of any other.  The addition of unit-level serialization and verification of authenticity to that supply chain over the next few years as required by the Falsified Medicines Directive (FMD) and the Delegated Act (EUDA) is going to be difficult (see “Breaking News: The EC Has Published The Delegated Act“).  It represents a huge change to the way drugs are packaged and how they are handled by each entity in the supply chain.  It is vital that the transition Continue reading Insufficient Transitional Measures Doom The FMD-EUDA