Tag Archives: EPCIS

Blockchain Will Not Be Used For DSCSA Data Exchange

That’s right.  I have now concluded that Blockchain will never be used in the US supply chain to fulfill the DSCSA requirement for sellers to provide buyers with Transaction Information (TI) and Transaction Statements (TS) (see also “Could Blockchain Technology Be Used For DSCSA Compliance?”).  So if you are currently planning to do a pilot to test a proposed architecture to do that, I recommend that you adjust it to test something else (see also “What Should FDA Pilot?”).

In fact, the thing to test is whether or not it can be used to facilitate gathering the TIs for a given Standardized Numerical Identifier (SNI) going back to the original manufacturer, as needed after November 27, 2023 during a suspect product investigation or recall.  Those are rare events compared with the number of drug sales and shipments where the TI and TS will need to be exchanged.

How and why did I come to this conclusion?  Let me explain. Continue reading Blockchain Will Not Be Used For DSCSA Data Exchange

HDA Questions FDA’s Authority To Mandate A Centralized System For the EDDS

Man in camelhair business suit wearing Question Authority button on left lapelOnce again, the Healthcare Distribution Alliance (HDA) has submitted written comments to the FDA as a follow-up to the FDA’s most recent DSCSA Public Meeting held on December 5-6 (see “HDA Schools FDA On DSCSA”, and “FDA DSCSA Public Meeting #2, Still A Gulf”).  The comments cover seven “issues” HDA wanted to provide further comments on, beyond those already expressed in the public meeting itself and earlier written comments.  The seven issues include:

  1. HDA urges greater appreciation for and recognition of the ‘distributed model’…
  2. HDA recommends topics to address at the February 28 public meeting
  3. We expand upon certain data standard and exchange issues from the December public meeting
  4. …we offer suggestions for where ‘guardrails’ may be useful [to the industry]”
  5. We summarize our understanding of the aggregation and inference discussion at the public meeting…
  6. HDA urges FDA to begin undertaking the small business assessment mandated by the DSCSA
  7. …various other issues raised during the public meeting…

Continue reading HDA Questions FDA’s Authority To Mandate A Centralized System For the EDDS

EDDS: The New Data Exchange Requirements

The Enhanced Drug Distribution Security (EDDS) phase of the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) is due to begin on November 27, 2023.  That’s the first day that the US pharma supply chain is supposed to fully operate with serial numbers.  Yes, serial numbers in human readable and encoded into 2D barcodes will be on every drug packaged after November of this year, but there is only limited use of those serial numbers in the supply chain until 2023.  But when the EDDS starts, everything changes.  From that point on, every Transaction Information (TI) document must include the full DSCSA Unique Identifiers—including the serial numbers for the first time—that are physically included in the shipment, the Transaction History (TH) no longer needs to be exchanged, and the data exchange requirements change.  Let’s focus in on those data exchange changes. Continue reading EDDS: The New Data Exchange Requirements

What Should FDA Pilot?

Last week the FDA announced it will coordinate one or more pilot(s) to assist in the development of the electronic, interoperable system that will identify and trace drugs in the U.S. under the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA) in its Enhanced Drug Distribution Security (EDDS) phase starting in 2023.  Once they start work on pilot planning, they will call for proposals from stakeholders and others.  But they can’t start until they get permission from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and they won’t even ask OMB for permission until they collect comments on the proposed collection of information associated with establishing the pilot program.  Believe it or not, that was the Continue reading What Should FDA Pilot?

Blockchain Reigns At GS1 Connect 2017

Maybe I’m just hyper sensitive to all things blockchain right now, but it sure seemed like the topic of blockchain permeated the sessions and the halls at last week’s GS1 Connect conference, GS1 US’s annual membership event.  Oddly, all of the official blockchain content was outside the Healthcare track.  The technology is certainly applicable in all industries and apparently there is interest in it outside of the healthcare vertical within GS1 US.  But what I observed there leads me to think we are very close to an important tipping point. Continue reading Blockchain Reigns At GS1 Connect 2017

DSCSA Serialization: What Wholesalers Expect

Image of McKesson's sign on their corporate headquarters building in San Francisco, CARecently, several of the larger U.S. wholesale distributors have sent letters to their suppliers to review what they expect from them relative to the Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA).  You may recall that these companies have provided requirements in advance of earlier DSCSA deadlines (see “U.S. Drug Wholesale Distributors Provide Direction To Manufacturers“).  These expectations are aimed at the November 27, 2017 serialization requirements and beyond. Continue reading DSCSA Serialization: What Wholesalers Expect

The New GS1 US DSCSA Implementation Guidance Suite

A few weeks ago, GS1 US published version 1.2 of the DSCSA implementation guidance that documents how to apply GS1 standards when meeting the U.S. Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA).  GS1 US is the GS1 Member Organization (MO) in the United States, of GS1, the global supply chain standards organization.  Companies who market drugs in the U.S. pharma supply chain and their solution providers will find this new version to be an indispensable resource that will Continue reading The New GS1 US DSCSA Implementation Guidance Suite

Decommissioning Under the FMD/EUDR

iStock_83566139_smallerIt is a little surprising that the European Union Delegated Regulation (EUDR) uses a form of the word “decommission” 67 times, but not even once uses the opposite term, “commission”.  Article 3.2(c) of the EUDR defines the term ‘decommissioning of a unique identifier’ as:

“… the operation changing the active status of a unique identifier stored in the repositories system referred to in Article 31 of this Regulation to a status impeding any further successful verification of the authenticity of that unique identifier;”

It is a striking omission to define how to change the active status of a drug to impede successful verification, but to fail to define the opposite operation that sets the active status to enable successful verification in the first place. Continue reading Decommissioning Under the FMD/EUDR