Tag Archives: supply chain security

The Congressional Draft Proposal to Improve Drug Distribution Security

Yesterday I received several notices of the latest attempt to introduce a national drug supply chain security bill into Congress.  That is, the publication of a discussion draft produced by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee and the House Energy and Commerce Committee.  Download it in PDF form from Senator Harkin’s website.

I wanted to get this notice out this morning but I won’t have a full analysis until my Monday essay.  Stay tuned for that.

The email I received included the following explanation from Kathleen Laird of the HELP Committee: Continue reading The Congressional Draft Proposal to Improve Drug Distribution Security

Supply Chain Data Synchronization and Patient Safety

Does the supply chain itself make any contribution to patient safety?  The legitimate pharmaceutical supply chain is that complex web of companies that move drugs from the manufacturers to the pharmacies that dispense them to patients.  The supply chain always includes both of those end points (manufacturer and pharmacy) and, in the U.S., normally also includes at least one wholesaler.  The supply chain is typically viewed as “Manufacturer to Wholesaler to Pharmacy”, whether the pharmacy is within a hospital, clinic, retail independent, chain store, grocery store, or mail order.  The great majority of prescription drugs arriving in the hands of U.S. patients have passed through this supply chain.

So what contribution does this chain make toward the safety of those patients?  In my view, it comes in three ways: Continue reading Supply Chain Data Synchronization and Patient Safety

Who’s Responsible for Global Supply Chain Security?

My favorite pharmaceutical supply chain blog is DrugChannels by Dr. Adam J. Fein (PhD). Dr. Fein started his blog in May 2006. I became a subscriber and regular reader sometime later that year. The focus of DrugChannels is “Pharmacy economics and the pharmaceutical supply chain”, which has often included very rational opinions on the economic viability of various pedigree laws.

My RxTrace blog has only been around for a short time and its focus is “the intersection between the pharmaceutical supply chain, track and trace technology, standards and regulatory compliance”. This is almost the inverse of DrugChannels. I’d like to think they are complementary but I suppose we can’t judge that until I generate quite a few more posts. Either way, I owe quite a lot to Dr. Fein and DrugChannels because they provided me the inspiration for starting this blog.

In a recent email exchange, Dr. Fein drew my attention to the FDA document, “Safer Medical Products: Investments for Supply Chain Safety and Security”, a 22-page apparent explanation for an increase of $166,433,000 and 346 FTE’s in the FDA’s FY 2010 budget proposal. Part of the increase “…includes investments that will allow FDA to implement new approaches to effectively regulate the safety and security of the supply chain of medical products …”. “Medical products” include human drugs, vaccines, blood and other biological products, medical devices, animal drugs and medicated feed.

New Approaches

The biggest driver of the need for the increase is the rapid globalization of the supply chain for medical products that end up in the medicine cabinets of Americans.

“The priorities proposed in this initiative will assure the safety and security of foreign and domestic sources of ingredients, components, and finished products at all points in the supply chain…”.

“Supply Chain Safety and Security relies on risk-based prevention with a verification-focused approach to hold all segments of industry accountable for ensuring that their products meet U.S. safety standards, with FDA verifying compliance with standards.”

“FDA will increase medical product safety and security by enhancing oversight of entities in the supply chain.”

The proposal promises to hire more experts and modernize FDA information technology. But it also includes funds to fight internet drug fraud, and to allow FDA to develop policy options related to drug importation.

“FDA will develop policies to implement the Administration’s policy of allowing Americans to buy safe and effective drugs from other countries.”

So is the FDA Responsible for Global Supply Chain Security?

Lots of interesting content for everyone to mull over. Daniel R. Matlis, president of Axendia, has done just that in a post on the PharmTechTalk blog. In his post he uses the FDA document to question whether securing the global medical products supply chain should be the FDA’s responsibility or the industry’s. It’s an interesting question and Matlis juxtaposes the FDA paper against comments reportedly made by Gerald Migliaccio, Vice President of Quality, EHS and Agility at Pfizer Global Manufacturing at a recent joint session of the PharmTech Conference and the Manufacturing Execution System in Life-Sciences Congress. Migliaccio believes that, “Supply chain security is the responsibility of all parties involved in procurement/ sourcing, manufacturing, packaging and distribution of raw materials, intermediates and final product.”

Matlis concludes that industry and regulators have different roles in securing the supply chain and that we all benefit by their efforts. After raising such a provocative question, I felt let down by such a milquetoast conclusion. Like Gerald Migliaccio, I believe the responsibility for supply chain security falls squarely on every participant in that chain, global or domestic. FDA is an arm of our government—that which is of, by and for…us, the consumers, the patients. To me, it seems backwards to make the consumer/patient responsible for the safety and security of the supply of products that are advertised as being safe and beneficial to our health and wellbeing.

I’m not arguing against the existence of the FDA, only the argument that it is up to the FDA to ensure the safety and security of the supply chain. What we need from the FDA are standards that ensure that illegitimate supply chain activity can be detected automatically by the supply chain participants themselves. Arming each buyer in every purchase transaction in the supply chain with the means to reliably, quickly and independently verify each prior transaction back to the original manufacturer would accomplish exactly that. I’ll explain how that can be done in future posts.